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Tag Archives: immigration

Domestic Worker Wage Theft? There’s an App for That.

Domestic worker activists are some of the most innovative organizers on the planet. So I was very excited to learn about a new app designed by immigrant rights activists in Jackson Heights for day laborers. The app allows users to record hours and wages, document working conditions, and identify abusive employers with a history of things like withholding compensation.

What is most important about the app is that it allows workers to do all of this anonymously. In addition to the isolation of the work, the risk associated with visibility is another barrier to domestic worker organizing. Because a number of domestic workers are undocumented, confidentiality is of the utmost importance.

And the hard work has already started. Just this week The Workers Justice Project in Brooklyn demonstrated against a woman named Jacklyn Wahba for refusing to pay her domestic worker…in front of her house. To which I say: good for them. Black women domestic worker organizers did something similar in the thirties.

The refusal to give domestic workers basic labor protections is an affront to their human rights. Even more than that, it gives employers the right to abuse those who work for them without every having to be held accountable. I support these workers in taking accountability into their own hands with this new app. And my hope is that we can leave abusive employers on the cutting room floor.

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2015: The Year of Dignity for Domestic Workers

2015: The Year of Dignity for Domestic Workers

It’s been quite a year for me. I finished a PhD. I learned a lot of new things about the history of domestic work in my family. I traveled to three countries. I read for pleasure. I published 15 blogs on this site. And, more importantly, my musings about domestic workers became a part of an amazing media collaboratory, a project we call The Newest Americans.

But even more than that I witnessed domestic worker activists make history over and over again. I am awed by their hard work, dedication, steadfastness, and most importantly the pride and dignity with which they do this hard but important work for women, workers, and migrant families all over the world.

I witnessed a dynamic conversation surrounding Ai Jen Poo’s new book, The Age of Dignity. It’s a short book that tells a big story about the central role played by elder caregivers in the health and wellness of our society.

I share in the celebration as Oregon and Connecticut became the next two states to pass legislation guaranteeing labor rights for domestic workers.

This year, over a hundred domestic workers marched one hundred miles to bring attention to the need of immigration policies that support women and families. Side note: they are advocating for “common sense immigration policies.” Brilliant.

These historic moments are being created and facilitated by working women of color. The everyday women in families like mine whose names we may never know, but whose work we all benefit from.

I am always honored to be asked to participate in this important discourse about domestic work in any small way. The experience is always transformative and I am consistently reminded that their story is my story. Its our story. Because these are the women that make all other work possible. They  make us who we are. Literally. When they win, we win.

Inspired by their relentless journey to justice, and by several conversations I’ve had this year with those wiser than me, in 2016, I pledge to write more. Not for academic credentials. Or for visibility. But for the women in my family who have taken this lifelong journey and are unafraid to share their stories with me. For the scholars I revere, people like Mary Romero and Premila Nadasen, who have spent their entire careers researching and writing about domestic workers and lending their support to the movement in any way they can.

But most importantly for me. Because I need to write in order to understand. So here’s to a new year of blogging. (Once a week…I promise…really…I put it in my google calendar.) And to remaking these thoughts into something more powerful than the cutting room floor.

To Unionize or not to Unionize: That is the Question

For the last couple weeks I have been finishing this chapter on the amazing Esther Cooper Jackson and her master’s thesis written in 1940 on domestic workers and unions. Its pretty damn incredible. During the first half of the twentieth century domestic workers formed unions in Birmingham, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Newark, Washington, D.C., Cincinnati, and a host of other cities.

These unions were quite militant. Neva Ryan, the president of the Chicago Domestic Workers Association wrote in a 1934 editorial that she didn’t know why domestic workers had not revolted long ago. But that the new union was the writing on the wall.

Of course, this was not without a significant amount of resistance from employers and agencies. Take for instance this anti-union posted from a 1942 article published in NY PM Daily.

Anti Union Poster from PM Daily 1941

I’m really just sharing this because I find it laughable. One woman alone can run a household! She simply chooses not to! Of course. Sigh.

Anyway, on to the subject of this post. Currently, domestic workers in the United States are not permitted to unionize under the National Labor Relations Act. Domestic workers over the years have set aside a movement for inclusion in the Act, in favor of advocating for legislation guaranteeing minimum wage, social security, maximum hours, etc.

But now that domestic worker bills’ of rights have been passed in several states the question of unionization is back on the table. It’s a really complex issue.

First, there is the issue of citizenship. Unions would not necessarily be able to protect those who are undocumented. Because immigration issues are so important to organizers, as they should be since a significant number of domestic workers in the US are immigrant women, they are invested in exploring other models for representing workers.

I wonder how well bills of rights will protect undocumented workers at all? Hmm. I will have to get back to you on this.

As an aside, in many parts of Europe undocumented workers do have certain legislative protections and can be advocated for by unions. Just gonna leave that there. Since I could write a tome about America and the politics of migrant labor and capitalism. I have to resist including this in the dissertation all the time.

But then there is the pressing issue of enforcing the bills of rights. Many domestic worker advocates and activists see unionizing as the answer. It would give workers the ability to collectively bargain, and a way to combat the isolation of private household work.

I have no idea what the right answer is here. Its a really tough question. But what I will say is that I learned an important lesson as a scholar by witnessing these debates at various times.

I think labor scholars and Leftists like myself sometimes get caught up in the magic that was early twentieth century labor organizing. To be barred from unionizing was a major injustice in my eyes. Because I know what unions can do. Or, should I say, did do.

I have watched labor scholars both relish in the melancholy that is the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the glory days of Left labor organizing, while advocating for unionizing where ever it is not.

Thanks to my research and conversations with current domestic workers, I realize that unions are not the only, and not always the best means for organizing. Especially in this moment, which is nothing like the moment in which Neva Ryan called for domestic workers to revolt.

Parts of that long gone movement seem to be returning. I see elements of it in the organizing of fast food workers, for instance. But issues of race, gender, and citizenship complicate this question for domestic workers.

I find that the debate has really expanded my historical lens and compelled me to ask new and different questions. I’m a better scholar for it.

As for now, I can finally remove the post-it on my desk reminding me to write this post. And leave the question of rather or not to unionize here on the cutting room floor.

How to Conduct a Revolution

A lot has gone on since my last post. Basically the country imploded. Exploded? Basically police are running amok. And people are rightfully outraged and saying so in a myriad of ways. A few days ago I posted the following facebook status:

Over the last few days I have heard, overheard, and participated in conversations about the current resistance movement(s) and its impact on working people. In the spirit of Ella Baker I humbly offer my thoughts here: Step one of every black political movement from voters rights, to bus boycotts, to the Panthers was to provide daily necessities (food, clothing, etc) for those affected by and committed to the cause. Go easy on our brothers and sisters who take issue with the shutting down of streets for protests because they can’t get to and from work. Fear of losing jobs or arrest is real for those who have families in particular. Not having to worry about these things is a privilege. Remember these folks as you organize and demonstrate. Make sure that your collective or organization works to put infrastructures in place to provide resources to the black working poor who can and should be in positions of leadership as those most affected.

Similarly, I have been praising the efforts of domestic workers, Walmart workers, and fast food workers. They should be our examples for how to organize. They get it.

For example, domestic workers plan meetings on days when household workers are usually off. At these meetings they provide childcare for members. Ai-Jen Poo, head of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, plans to use her MacArthur grant to provide wages for women to work on the movement full time.

More importantly, domestic worker organizers have figured out how to facilitate a transnational movement that pays very close attention to local contexts. While immigrant rights are central to women working in New York, in Atlanta the history of African American women’s labor takes precedent. As it should.

The resistance work that these folks do is highly organized and very strategic. It is done in the interest of serving the folks each movement represents.There is a tremendous amount of thought and research that goes into each step.

But most importantly it is done with the greatest amount of empathy. There is room for folks to feel. The most effective movement leaders, past and present, figure out ways to say “I hear you.” They can simultaneously build a resistance movement and a community of people who are strong enough to sustain it in spite of obstacles.

I do not profess to be some sort of expert on organizing. There is certainly not only one right way to do it. What I am saying is that there are movements happening now that we should look to as we begin an urgent and necessary movement against police brutality.  Humbly I share with you my thoughts, from the cutting room floor.

from scholarship to real life

So…I have been working on this super secret project in a neighboring city a couple days a week. (Don’t tell my advisor…k?) Anyway, while getting a doctorate may seem glamorous, fellowships just don’t pay enough to match that glamour. Alas, its the life I chose. And I love it, but still graduate poverty is real. Anyway, I live well below my means so I take public transportation everywhere. Which I actually like. I get a lot of reading done that way.

Anyway, because I am an expert at it I naturally found the most cost effective and efficient way to get from a to b. I knew that a number of transit routes are designed for workers but now I saw it first hand. This particular bus goes into said neighboring city (a wealthy community) during the morning commute and doesn’t make the return trip until the afternoon. I took the first trip back and the bus driver asked me why I got off of work so early. The bus was empty. And it was sort of eerie. In fact, the building I am working in has a bus stop that coincides with the underside of the building next to the service entrance. I have never been to a building with a service entrance. Also weird. Everyone on the bus was a person of color. Mostly women. Many of them latino and spanish speaking.

As I was telling a friend of mine it sort of reminds me of the historical sun down towns, where African Americans during Jim Crow were permitted to go to work (and only in uniform) but they had to be gone by sundown. It sort of blows my mind that there are entire transit routes dedicated to restricted access to communities. If one were going there to shop or see a movie it would be almost impossible to do it. The bus doesn’t stop there. The train station is nowhere near it.

Thus even in congested places like metropolitan areas, there are ways of organizing communities on the basis of race, class, and immigration status. I’m wondering what Marx would say about public transportation. Or even global technologies of travel, migration, and trafficking. But that is way outside of my purview. And other scholars have done it. So its here…on the cutting room floor.